Past Principals

Miss. E. P. Ireson 
(1897-1902) & (1910-1912)
Miss Ireson was the first Principal of the High School. She was an admirable teacher specially in mathematics. After a spell of eight years in England she returned back to Vembadi in 1910 and was in charge of the boarding and training schools. She was loved by all.
Miss Lily Hall
(1901-1902)
Ms Lily Hall was sent out in 1901 to replace Ms Ireson, but soon she was transferred to Batticaloa..During her stay she looked after the boarding school until Ms J Mallinson took over the boarding school.
Miss. J. Mallinson
(1902-1904)
Ms Mallinson arrived in latter  part of 1901 to take charge of the boarding school. As Ms Hall left, she supervised the High School until Ms Mosscrop arrived. In March 1904 she was transferred to Ikkadu India. 
Ruth Mosscrop
(1903) 
She was sent in place (arrived) of Ms Hall in 1903. “Making complete woman” was kept in view during this period. First old girls reunion was held. Soon she too was transferred to Bengal. 
Ms. Watson
(1905-1907)
Ms Watson was appointed to supervise the work of both schools. Steady work in both schools. She fell sick and returned to England. Ms Kerr came from India and took charge of both schools.
Miss. C. B. Hornby
(1908-1913) 
Miss C B Hornby came out of England to take charge of the high school in 1908. She reintroduced the Junior Cambridge Examination classes and the following year girls entered for the examination. She had great organizing ability and good singer herself.
Miss. Kerr
(1907-1908 and 1913-1915)
Miss Kerr took charge for six months, until the successor Ms Hornby took over. When Miss C B Hornby went back to England Miss Kerr was appointed again till Miss E A Lythe’s arrival. She worked hard to cope with the new demands of the education department while battling with the greatest difficulty of that time, the constant changing of staff. Though Miss Kerr was a supply teacher she was keenly interested in the progress of the school.
Miss. E. A. Lythe
(1915-1920)
Miss Lythe arrived in early part of 1915. Since the school had very spacious premises the classes were able to spread out. She tried to bring the school up to required standard. During her period the qualification of staff improved, Old Girls Association was formed. She returned to England on furlough in 1920.
Miss. M. Creedy 
(1920-1922)
She was very musical, brilliantly clever. She gained her mathematical Tripos at Cambridge. She brought with her the true Guide spirit and introduced the school to the “School Guide Movement” Music classes were introduced.
Miss. M. Pickard
(1923-1927)
A person of singular ability, impressive personality and varied talents arrived in 1923. She worked very hard to raise the status so that it may be recognized and registered as a secondary school, for it was still working on its elementary registration. Miss Pickard’s period marked the beginning of a new chapter in the progressive expansion of the school . She rebuilt and remoulded the school. The years 1923-1927 were years of renewals and renovations.
Miss. E. Scowcroft  She was the Vice-Principal when Miss Pickard was the Principal. All that was began by Miss Pickard was carried on by Miss Scowcroft. She laid the foundation for the modern Vembadi. Vembadi celebrated it’s centenary in 1938, during Miss Scowcreoft’s period. The devotion and dedication shown by her during her period for the advancement of the school, helped not only to rebuild the school, but also to complete development in several areas.
Miss. E. M. Wilson She came from China in 1927, taught mathematics and domestic science. Energetic and cheerful person there was no fear of girls going to sleep during her lessons. When Ms Scowcroft went on furlough in 1928 she acted as principal. The schoolwork was well maintained and she took keen interest in games. She left Vembadi at the end of 1930.
Miss. Dore  Trained graduate, specialized in geography came in 1933. Reorganized the drill and games in the school.
Miss. M. B. Barker
(1940-1942 and 1947-1949) 
Born in Ceylon Miss Barker was a strict disciplinarian who was very firm with the students but at the same time cared for their welfare and progress. She paid special attention to punctuality, general appearance, dress and behaviour of the students.
Miss. M. Thambiah
(1949-1971) 
Miss. M Thambiah who rose from the position of teacher, Vice Principal to Principal was the first National and the longest serviing principal of Vembadi. During her time the school was elected to grade “A” status. A great geography  teacher, and a wonderful guide to all students. A large number of students secured admission to the Universities during her time. The devotion and dedication shown by her during her period for the advancement of the school made Vembadi a leading school in  the peninsula. Many who were associated with her and studied during her time described her as the architect of modern Vembadi. Though she was really saddened and devastated when the school was taken over by the government in 1960, she calmly adopted Vembadi to the changes, so that the school continued to provide increasing facilities to the growing number of students. Her period is recognized as the ‘Golden Era’ in the history of the school. A school which was founded, developed and taken care of  by the missionaries, for nearly one and a half centuries, was given over to the government during Miss Thambiah’s time. Thus she became the first principal of Vembadi under the government. Miss Thambiah retired in 1971 
Miss. P. Arumugam
(1971-1981) 
She was the first Hindu principal of Vembadi Girls High School. Mrs Arumugam was the former principal of…….. She worked for the development of the school. She started the first carnatic music band in the island called “Murasoli”.
Mrs. A. Rajaratnam
(1981-1989) 
Former principal of Manipay Ladies College took over the reins of Vembadi in 1981, not expecting she was going to face most difficult period in her services. Our proximity to Jaffna fort exposed to shelling and bombing and danger for life. In 1987 there were suggestions to abandon our school premises from Vembadi and to have afternoon section at Hindu Ladies College, Ms Rajaratnam, decided to carry on in our own grounds. When the Jaffna town was deserted she remained at Vembadi to look after our buildings and equipments. If not for dedication Vembadi would have been reduced to mere esplanade. 
Miss. R. Rajaratnam
(1989-1993)
Miss Rajaratnam who rose from the position of teacher to principal of the school served at Vembadi for many years and continued the good work of her predecessors during the difficult period.